Last week the article covered pressure drop correction calculations. Today we offer you some handy charts to use for second glycol correction pressure drop. Example: I have calculated the water piping pressure drop through a chilled water system to be 80 feet using the System Syzer. Question: What is the pressure drop if I have 50% Ethylene Glycol/Water with temperatures of 45°F to 55°F? Answer: The average temperature is 50°F, so my factor is 1.47. [Read more…]... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
Question: I have selected my piping friction loss based on water, but I am pumping a glycol solution. What correction do I use? Answer: There are three glycol corrections when designing a hydronic or process cooling system; heat transfer correction, pressure drop correction, and pump curve correction. This R L Deppmann Monday Morning Minute defines the second of three glycol corrections. [Read more…]... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
A customer recently called us about an unusual occurrence in a closed hydronic cooling system for an ice rink. The system was filled using a... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
Sometimes simple things can slow you down in the design of hydronic heating and cooling systems. Air vents for use in water and glycol systems... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
Glycol correction factors were the subject of many of the last few R. L. Deppmann Monday Morning Minutes. While writing these articles, I thought about... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
Ask any test/balance or service technician in the hydronic HVAC world to convert PSIG to feet of head and the multiplier of 2.31 is the... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
  The last couple of R. L. Deppmann Monday Morning Minutes introduced the BTUH corrections required when using glycol in hydronic heating and cooling systems.... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
In the last R. L. Deppmann Monday Morning Minute, I provided the BTUH correction factors for propylene glycol. We don’t want to play favorites so... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
We are all familiar with the BTUH formula (BTUH = GPM x ΔT x 500) used to calculate the gallons per minute (GPM) water flow... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)
In part 1 and part 2 of this series, we discussed maximum and minimum heated water velocities in Bell & Gossett SU heat exchangers with standard... READ MORE
Printer Friendly (PDF)

Categories